Category “Global Climate Destabilization”

What’s your emissions quota?

nclimate2384

Figure 2 | Quotas, cumulative committed emissions and fossil-fuel reserves. Past cumulative fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (purple), future committed
emissions (orange) and available fossil-fuel carbon quotas to meet warming limits of 2, 2.5 and 3 °C with 50% probability (green), for 10 regions and
the world, under inertia, blended and equity sharing principles. Stacked bars are cumulative; numbers give the contribution of each increment in Gt CO2.
Negative increments are shown below the zero axis. Also shown are fossil-fuel reserves (coal, oil, gas, unconventional oil, unconventional gas).

In: Raupach et al. (2014) ‘Sharing a quota on cumulative carbon emissions’, Nature Climate Change 4(10), p. 873-879.

 

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Global Climate Destabilisation

Frequency of occurrence (y axis) of local temperature anomalies (relative to 1951–1980 mean) divided by local standard deviation (x axis) obtained by counting gridboxes with anomalies in each 0.05 interval. Area under each curve is unity.

Source: James Hansen, Makiko Satoa and Reto Ruedy (2012) ‘Perception of climate change’ Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

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Mull on This

Source: David J. C. MacKay

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Apocalypse, Technofix or Back-to-Nature?

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CO2 leads Temperature during Pleistocene deglaciation

J. D. Shakun et al., 2012. ‘Global warming preceded by increasing carbon dioxide concentrations during the last deglaciation’, Nature, 484: p. 49-54.

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Civil conflict and El Niño

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On the wrong side of the Tide

Malé, Maldives

 

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Your Iceberg is Departing on Schedule

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Tuvalu’s Coconut Trees

“… Tuvalu’s call for urgent, decisive and comprehensive actions on climate change is not self-serving. Undoubtedly, we are the most vulnerable country to the impacts of climate change. The greatest width of land on Funafuti, our capital island, is 600 meters. The highest point is only four meters. When a cyclone hits, there are no mountains to climb, no inland to run to. Of course, we have coconut trees.”

– Enele Sopoaga, Tuvalu’s Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs, UN Climate Change Conference, 13 Dec 2010.

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An Island of Reason in an Ocean of Indulgence

“It’s easy for people in an air-conditioned room to continue with the policies of destruction of Mother Earth. We need instead to put ourselves in the shoes of families in Bolivia and worldwide that lack water and food and suffer misery and hunger.  People here in Cancún have no idea what it is like to be a victim of climate change.

– Evo Morales, UN Climate Change Conference, 10 Dec 2010 [emphasis mine]

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