Some Turns of Thought in Modern Philosophy

(1933) George Santayana

In particular, I liked the essays ‘Locke and the Frontiers of Common Sense’ and ‘Revolutions in Science: Some comments on the Theory of Relativity’.

“For it is not intrinsic clearness or coherence that make ideas persuasive, but connection with action, or with some voluminous inner response, which is readiness to act. It is a sense of on-coming fate, a compulsion to do or to suffer, that produces the illusion of perfect knowledge.”

“If all the arts aspire to the condition of music, all the sciences aspire to the condition of mathematics.”

Text: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16712/16712-h/16712-h.htm

Audio: http://librivox.org/some-turns-of-thought-in-modern-philosophy-by-george-santayana/

2 Responses to “Some Turns of Thought in Modern Philosophy”

  1. Rob says:

    What is it that you think the second quoted text means?

    “If all the arts aspire to the condition of music, all the sciences aspire to the condition of mathematics.”

    1. Jelte says:

      I think Santayana means several things here. For one, I think he is suggesting that sciences strive to provide – nay, identify – exactly delineable concepts living comfortably alongside one another.

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